#2MilyonPyebwaAyiti | #2MillionTreesHAiTi

#2MilyonPyebwaAyiti | #2MillionTreesHAiTi

www.haitifriends.org

Hait Timber Re-Introduction Program (HTRIP) is a response to the severe poverty in the mountains of Haiti. Now in our 9th year we have provided education to 7,500 farmers and on June 30th, the HTRIP staff will plant the 2 millionth tree in Haiti. Watch our trip via Facebook to see the live action planting!

#‎2MillionTreesHAiTi‬   |   ‪#‎2MilyonPyebwaAyiti‬


Upcoming Free, Public, Haitian Art Show at the

Haiti Friends Art Gallery 

6739 Reynolds Street | PGH | PA | 15206

Summer Sequins: Celebrating Haitian Art with Shiny Sparkles of Sequins

Friday, June 19, 2015

7 p.m. to 10 p.m.


Founded in 1985, and incorporated in 1999, the Friends of HAS Haiti DBA Haiti Friends is based in Pittsburgh, PA


   Haiti Friends | 6739 Reynolds Street | Pittsburgh | PA | 15206 

                                 info@haitifriends.org | 412.361.4884

                                         

HTRIP Celebrates World Environment Day with UNEP

Over the weekend, we at HTRIP join the United Nations Environment Program in celebrating World Environment Day under the theme: Seven Billion Dreams. One Planet. Consume with Care. We also want to take the occasion to highlight one of our many success stories of our education and tree planting program in the communities we serve.

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0in;
	mso-para-margin-right:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0in;
	line-height:115%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
       HTRIP’s demonstration plot in Ducasse planted in 2007.      HTRIP’s model starts with a demonstration plot which is planted in the first months of a community’s participation. The demonstration plot serves as a the initial phase of the program and also as a teaching tool in the educational cycle and a model for the “filial” plots that each participant plants on his or her own land. 

HTRIP’s demonstration plot in Ducasse planted in 2007. HTRIP’s model starts with a demonstration plot which is planted in the first months of a community’s participation. The demonstration plot serves as a the initial phase of the program and also as a teaching tool in the educational cycle and a model for the “filial” plots that each participant plants on his or her own land. 

Ducasse is a community that is part of the Verettes district, and it is one of HTRIP’s most isolated communities (elevation ranges from 1,000 to 1,300 meters) with a greater lack of infrastructure. The people of Ducasse began working with HTRIP in 2007 and in 8 years, 200 hundred people (105 men and 95 women) have graduated our Agroforestry education program, planted more than 50,000 thousand trees, and built about two hundred kilometers of soil conservation structures. 

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0in;
	mso-para-margin-right:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0in;
	line-height:115%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
      Ducasse’s 2014 graduates

Ducasse’s 2014 graduates

Ducasse  is one of the communities where the HTRIP model has succeeded. One can start seeing  the positive environmental effects in tree plots that are more than 5 years old where tree canopies are closing. In fact, HTRIP is in the process of establishing the second phase of the program in Ducasse. Last year, HTRIP conducted a shade-crop experiment with yam and passion fruit in a couple of these plots with a significant amount of tree cover. All of this is meant to ensure the sustainability of all the reforestation work performed in Phase I.

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0in;
	mso-para-margin-right:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0in;
	line-height:115%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
       HTRIP’s Nursery in Ducasse from 2014 tree production.      HTRIP makes sure that each community that participates in its program  has its  own nursery that can produce nearly 7,000 seedlings per year

HTRIP’s Nursery in Ducasse from 2014 tree production. HTRIP makes sure that each community that participates in its program  has its  own nursery that can produce nearly 7,000 seedlings per year

As we celebrate World Environment Day, we strongly applaud the courage and engagement of the people of Ducasse in fighting  deforestation, Haiti’s biggest environmental problem. We are also very grateful for the continuous support of all of our dedicated contributors, and reinforce our commitment to help environmentally vulnerable communities in Haiti to work toward making the world a better place.

Thank you,

 

Melissa Sanon,

HTRIP program coordinator

 

Haiti Friends at the August Wilson Center in January 2014

Here is the CBS article about the Haitian Art show at the August Wilson Center in 2014.

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — It has been a difficult past several months at the August Wilson Center. 

Its mission to celebrate African-American culture is threatened by financial problems.

This is not the Haiti that we see in network images of poverty and disaster. 

The colorful works of art, at the August Wilson Center, reflect a colorful culture in tune with the environment. 

The works were collected by Point Breeze art gallery owner Ian Rawson, who grew up on the Caribbean island.

“It’s humorous,” said Rawson. “It has joy. It has a wonderful spirit of empathy for the natural world. They’re ahead of us in the United States in terms off ecological management. This is the Haiti we know this is the Haiti I grew up in.”

The bright images are a counterpoint to the cloud of debt hovering over the August Wilson Center. Sala Udin is one of the founders.

“The city needs to see this as a city resource, not just a black resource,” Udin said. “All we have to do is present good art and the public will come. But we have to take care of this treasure and we intend to do that.”

Historian John Ford shared stories of the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King’s march on Washington. 

He then shows a map of Africa from 1732, which shows the two main slave ports. 

The North Side man has been collecting African American artifacts for more than 45 years — puzzle pieces of a history that was almost erased by slavery. 

“Everyone knows their history, but we don’t,” Ford said. “That history was taken away from us. And that history will give us the fortitude we need to move forward.”

A sentiment that’s shared by the supporters of the August Wilson Center.